Henri Matisse, Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal), 1914

HenriMatisse
Henri Matisse, Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal), 1914, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Boston, Massachusetts
“I would like to recapture that freshness of vision which is characteristic of extreme youth when all the world is new to it” Henri Matisse, who originally was studying to become, and eventually worked as law clerk, until 1889, when recovering from an appendicitis operation, his mother handed him a box of paints in order to rid young Matisse of boredom. That is when Henri fell in love with painting, using every bit of his free time to paint. As a matter of fact, Matisse became so bored with his job as a law clerk, that he took to shooting people passing by his window with spitballs from a peashooter! Towards the end of his life, Matisse thought very highly of his status within the art world, and wanting to leave a lasting impression on society with some kind of a monumental master work, and felt rather disappointed that no one has approached him to design a museum or a library or any kind of a grandiose building, at that matter. So you can imagine the artist’s joy when he was finally asked to create the Chapelle du Rosaire de Vence, a small chapel in Vence, on the French Riviera. Matisse’s quick agreement to design the stained glass windows shocked many of his friends, who knew him as a devout atheist, especially Pablo Picasso, who was Matisse’s life long “frienemy”. Picasso was so shocked at his friend’s decision that he asked of Matisse, “Why not paint a brothel?” to which Henri quickly responded, “No one asked me!” Pictured here is Henri Matisse, Woman on a High Stool (Germaine Raynal), 1914, at Matisse in the Studio exhibition, Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Boston, Massachusetts
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