Edward Hopper, From Williamsburg Bridge, 1928

EdwardHopper

Edward Hopper, From Williamsburg Bridge, 1928, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, New York

 

“If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint”- Edward Hopper. One of my other top five favorites (along with Joan Miro whose birthday was yesterday!) Hopper is a mesmerizing artist. Born in Nyack, New York in 1882 (Hopper’s house still stands and has been preserved as a historical site) Hopper originally worked as an illustrator, although his passion has always been to be a painter. Considered to be an American realist, Edward’s paintings depict an almost conundrum. To use this work as an example, which is titled From Williamsburg Bridge, painted in 1928, it depicts a row of New York City buildings as seen from the bridge. As it is a well known fact that New York City is filled to the brim with people, and especially in 1928 when apartment buildings were overstuffed with large families, in this work we only see one person, a woman in a window. With how many people New York City has, and presumably how many people could be inside of those buildings, we get a sense of isolation and emptiness still, being able to see just one figure. In such a metropolis as New York, Hopper creates this feeling for us of isolation and disconnect. Hopper puts us into a position of a watcher, observing this scene of isolation, and almost purposefully making us uncomfortable, feeling alone and vulnerable. Edward Hopper, From Williamsburg Bridge, 1928, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, New York
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